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Community is invited to join WSU’s Culture of Respect

On February 27th, WSU Pullman is inviting the community to participate in the kickoff event for the Culture of Respect, a campus-wide initiative. The Culture of Respect is a two-year commitment where a team of faculty, staff, students, and community partners from across Pullman will evaluate and enhance our efforts to prevent sex- and gender-based violence on our campus.

Everyone is welcome to come and get involved. Opportunities for you to participate and learn more include:

  • Join our campus team (5 hours per month commitment)
  • Request a Culture of Respect Overview for your department or RSO
  • Attend the kickoff event on February 27th at 11:30am in Lighty 405
  • Share this information with colleagues and friends

Since 2011, WSU has grown tremendously in the prevention of sex- and gender-based violence and the Culture of Respect will continue to build on this strong foundation. At this first meeting, we will be forming the campus team and providing more information about what the initiative involves.

Over the course of the spring term, the CORE Evaluation will be completed to assess our current work and working groups will be established to address the areas our campus can continue to grow in.

The areas we will focus on include:

  • Survivor support
  • Clear policies on misconduct, investigations, adjudications, and sanctions
  • Multitiered education for the entire campus
  • Public disclosure of statistics
  • Schoolwide mobilization with student groups and leaders
  • Ongoing self-assessment

We will be sharing our goals and progress throughout this process, which began in January 2019 when WSU Pullman joined the third cohort of NASPA’s Culture of Respect Collective. The third cohort includes WSU and 37 other higher education institutions in the United States and internationally.

The next meeting will be held March 22nd at 1pm in Lighty 405. If you are interested in getting involved, please contact Tara Johnson, Health Promotion Specialist, at tara.l.johnson@wsu.edu

Information Regarding Bacterial Meningitis

Medical professionals from Washington State University’s Cougar Health Services have received inquiries regarding a case of bacterial meningitis on the WSU Pullman campus. There are many causes of bacterial meningitis, and although they are all serious, they are not all equally contagious. Please know that WSU does NOT have meningococcal meningitis on campus, which is the most dangerous form of meningitis for college students.

Cougar Health Services has been in contact with local health experts and the Whitman County Department of Health and have determined that there are no additional recommended preventive measures related to meningitis for campus members or close contacts of an ill student at this time. WSU campus members are not currently at increased risk for contracting meningitis.

As always, anyone with symptoms of illness or questions about their personal health should contact their healthcare provider for advice. Pullman students can contact Cougar Health Services at 509-335-3575 or schedule an appointment at https://cougarhealth.wsu.edu/appointments/

For more information about bacterial meningitis: https://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/index.html

While meningococcal meningitis is not currently present on the WSU Pullman campus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention do recommend that all adolescents receive a meningococcal immunization. Many WSU students have already received this vaccine. For more information: https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/vaccine-info.html

Get involved in student health

Get involved in student health
Get involved in student health

Want to advocate for student health concerns, influence decisions around health services and initiatives, and gain valuable working knowledge of management and leadership? Then join our Student Health Advisory Committee (SHAC)!

SHAC works to improve Health & Wellness Services and Counseling and Psychological Services by acting as an advisory group to the executive director and serving as a liaison among students, student government, and administrators.

SHAC will review programs and services, recommend new programs, and advise on financial matters. Students on SHAC also work closely with our staff to provide insightful feedback on services and initiates related to mental, physical, and emotional health.

By joining SHAC you’ll:

  • Have opportunities to network with professionals in the health industry
  • Bolster your resume with real experience in health care
  • Gain essential communication and leadership skills

We’re looking for exceptional student leaders to get involved in SHAC. If you’re interested, contact Rachel Oliver.

Information on Measles

Physician's white coat with stethoscope and pens in pocket.

Measles is a serious disease that causes a rash and fever. Measles is very contagious. It spreads when a person with measles breathes out, coughs, or sneezes. Anyone who is not vaccinated is much more likely to get measles if exposed. Measles can be dangerous, especially for young children. In rare cases, it can be deadly.

SYMPTOMS OF MEASLES AND HOW IT SPREADS
Measles often begins with a high fever, cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes. After 3-5 days, a rash usually begins on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. You can catch measles from an infected person as early as 4 days before they have a rash and for up to 4 days after the rash appears. You can get measles just by being in a room where a person with measles has been. The measles virus stays in the air for up to two hours after that person has left the room.

PROTECTION AGAINST MEASLES
The best protection against measles is immunization. WSU requires verification of measles immunity for all students born after December 31, 1956. See more about the measles immunization requirements here. 

CALL YOUR DOCTOR OR CLINIC RIGHT AWAY IF YOU SEE SYMPTOMS
Your doctor or clinic will let you know if you need to come in for visit. Measles is very contagious and you could give it to someone in a waiting room. It’s important to tell your doctor or clinic that you have symptoms of measles before you go. They will give you instructions for what to do so that you don’t spread measles.

WSU students with measles symptoms or concerns can call us 24 hours a day at 509-335-3575 to speak with a nurse.

Preparing for your student’s visit

Your Coug is about to complete their first semester of college and will soon be traveling home for the holidays. It is important to recognize since their move, family dynamics, and expectations have likely shifted. Prepare for their visit by understanding these changes are normal to experience.

One of the more obvious changes your student has gone through is finding a sense of independence. This change is expected as your student moves away for the first time. However, it can be one of the more difficult changes to adjust to as a parent and family unit. Adjusting to an unfamiliar environment and schedule is a major challenge for most students. The shift in your Coug’s independence is an indication of a healthy transition.

Before their move to WSU, your student had a higher level of dependence on you. They had daily interactions with you and the family, followed household expectations, and their activities relied on your approval. These are the behaviors and expectations you have been accustomed to for their entire childhood and teenage years.

However, during their visit home, your Coug may expect flexibility with curfews, have a different sleep schedule, and make plans with friends. These behaviors may not be what you had in mind and might make you feel placed on the back burner. It is normal to feel frustrated and even disappointed during this time. What you’re feeling is the tension of two separate worlds coming together.

Your student’s plans may not align with your plans during their visit home. Understanding their plans and intentions during break can explain some of the frustrations you are feeling. Make sure to communicate any concerns you have while seeking to appreciate your student’s perspective and feelings. Visits are a learning experience for both you and your Coug. It’s okay to experience ups and downs during this time. While it is important to be supportive and understanding, your student still needs to respect specific responsibilities and rules you have set for the family.

Use these tips in preparation for your Coug’s first major visit home:

  1. Be open and supportive of the person your Coug is growing into
  2. Strike a balance between their new independence and family expectations
  3. Inform your student of any important changes within the household
  4. Ask your Coug if they have any plans during their visit
  5. Don’t overschedule their break

Become a peer health educator

Student receiving health screening.

This spring, our health promotion team is continuing a peer health education program. Peer health educators are a diverse group of undergraduate leaders who work with us to educate and empower their fellow students.

We consistently hear from students who are interested in peer health education programs, and studies show that students view peer health educators as credible and trustworthy sources of information. The program is supported by the Service & Activity Fee and will help increase our collaboration with students.

Students who participate in the program will receive a range of professional development opportunities, including training and hands-on experience. Peer educators will develop leadership and public speaking skills, foster positive working relationships, and gain foundational knowledge in a variety of health topics, including violence prevention, mental health, substance use, and life skills.

The application for becoming a peer health educator will open November 1 and close on December 3.

Students who are accepted into the program will receive BACCHUS training aon Sunday, January 13th and Sunday, January 20th from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Students will then take an exam for their peer educator certification. The program lasts one school year with 30 hours of involvement per semester and attend bi-weekly meetings on Wednesdays from 4:00 – 5:30pm.

If you have questions about the program, please contact Peyton Prothero.

Mental health and young adults

The transition to college is a time filled with excitement and new possibilities. But this season of life can also be challenging and stressful as you adjust to college and the changes in your life. Stress can develop from academic pressure, relationship changes, lack of sleep, and becoming more independent.

Stress is a normal part of life, but it can affect your mental health and impact not only school, but day to day living. In spring, we collected National College Health Assessment data at WSU Pullman and found in the last year, 86 percent of WSU students felt overwhelmed. Another 64 percent of Cougs expressed they felt very lonely.

Our mental health is how we manage our emotions and cope with stress. Just as we take care of our physical health, we can also care for our mental health. We can all work together to build a supportive campus community.

Cougs can take action to cope when feeling stressed, overwhelmed, or lonely. You can:

  • Spend time with friends and family
  • Participate in activities you enjoy doing
  • Eat a healthy meal
  • Exercise regularly
  • Take breaks from studying to rest and recharge
  • Get a good night of sleep

Every Coug should also be familiar with campus mental health resources. Cougar Health Services provides a free and confidential online mental health screening, which provides recommendations on campus resources to support your mental wellness.

We offer Mental Health First Aid and Campus Connect trainings, where participants learn how to identify mental illnesses, intervene during a crisis, and support themselves and others. WSU also have guides for helping students in distress.

WSU is following the JED approach to develop campus-wide collaboration for mental health awareness and suicide prevention.

To receive updates on WSU’s mental health efforts, subscribe to Cougar Health Services News.

Get your flu vaccine!

Get your flu vaccine

Flu season is approaching fast! You can prevent the flu by getting your flu vaccine at one of our Flu Shot Friday events or by making an appointment with your health care provider.
It’s important that you get your flu shot early in the season. After getting a flu vaccine, it takes about two weeks for your body to develop the antibodies that will protect you from flu virus.

Flu Shot Fridays 2018

Every Friday from September 28 to October 26 *
10 am — 3 pm
Washington Building, ground floor entrance

* Additional flu vaccine outreach will occur on Thursday, October 11 and will be hosted in Bustad Hall 110J, 10:30-1:30

Flu Shot Fridays are open to WSU students, faculty, and staff. We won’t be able to give the vaccine to those who are pregnant or under age 18.

Show up early if you can! We’re giving away free thermometers to the first 150 students each Friday.

Can’t make it to a Flu Shot Friday or want your shot sooner? Flu vaccines are available now in our clinic. Students can make an appointment to get a flu shot.

Cost

Flu shots are covered in full by most insurance plans. If you don’t have insurance or are concerned about costs, we’re here to help you! Contact our billing office at 509-335-3575.

Make sure to bring your insurance card! We won’t be taking payment at the time of service for Flu Shot Fridays, but we’ll get your insurance information for billing.

Parking options

We’ll have some parking spaces reserved in the green lot at Stadium Way and SE Nevada St. for Flu Shot Fridays. Reserved spaces will be marked with orange cones. Metered parking spots are available on NE Washington St.

There are also a number of zoned parking lots available nearby for permit holders. For a detailed parking map, visit Transportation Services. Our building is also easily accessible via public transit. Visit Pullman Transit for routes and schedules.

Help prevent the spread of lice

If you, or one of your close contacts, is experiencing symptoms of lice, you should be treated immediately. All infested persons including household members and close contacts as well as their bedmates, should be treated at the same time, if possible.

Consider treatment if you have:

  • Shared a bed with someone who has lice
  • Shared a hat, scarf, coat, clothes, hair ribbon, or barrettes
  • Had sex with someone with lice
  • Been in close contact with someone with lice

Lice treatment is available over the counter at the Cougar Health Services pharmacy, or at most local stores like Walmart, Rite Aid and grocery stores. In addition to treatment, the Center for Disease Control recommends taking the following steps and precautions if you or someone in your home has been infested with lice:

  • Wash and Dry in Hot Temperatures. Hats, scarves, pillowcases, bedding, clothing, and towels worn or used by the infested person in the 2-day period before treatment is started, can be machine washed and dried using hot water and hot air cycles. Lice and eggs are killed by exposure of 5 minutes in temperatures greater than 53.5°C (128.3°F).
  • Store and Seal in Plastic Bags. Items that cannot be laundered may be sealed in a plastic bag for two weeks.
  • Disinfect. Disinfect combs and brushes used by an infested person by soaking them in hot water (at least 130°F) for 5–10 minutes.
  • Do Not Share. Items such as hats, grooming aids, and towels that come in contact with the hair of an infested person should not be shared.
  • Vacuum and Clean. Vacuuming furniture and floors can remove infested persons’ hairs that might have viable nits attached.
  • Perform a Head Lice Check. Research video tutorials on how to perform a head lice check. Share videos with peers.

If you have concerns about a skin condition or reactions to treatment, please contact the Cougar Health Services medical clinic at 509-335-3575.