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March Peer Health Educator of the Month – Nives Quaye

Photo of CHS Peer Health Educator Nives Quaye
Photo of CHS Peer Health Educator Nives Quaye
CHS Peer Health Educator Nives Quaye

Nives Quaye is a fifth year senior at WSU completing a B.A. in human development and a B.S. in biology, with an emphasis in basic medical sciences. She joined the peer health education program in the fall of 2018. Her peers in the program nominated her for the March Peer Health Educator of the Month award. The award is given to peer health educators in recognition of their hard work and dedication to the program. We sat down with Nives to hear more about her time in the program and why she thinks other students would benefit from joining.

How has being a peer health educator been meaningful to you?

NQ: Well I actually want to go into Public Health, and health education is one of the things I want to do in the Public Health realm. I want to do programming and health education, so I feel that these tie in perfectly with what my future goals are. I feel it has given me more knowledge about health education in general and how to present to people about sensitive topics.

How do you think being a peer health educator has built career skills?

NQ: It’s definitely given me some experience in public speaking and how to interact in a large group setting. I also went to some workshops with Tamera Crooks, [the leadership coordinator for student involvement], where I learned about how different personalities can be integrated in the workspace and about being able to collaborate better with partners and in group settings.

What is the most important thing you’ve learned as a peer health educator?

NQ: I would say learning how to use more inclusive language when speaking to people was really emphasized in this position. For example, learning how to say pronouns when introducing yourself in a group of people. In my other positions I’ve been in [on campus], we never really went as in depth as in this program.

What would you say to someone who is considering becoming a peer health educator?

NQ: I would say, if you are passionate about educating other college students about just regular things that affect them on a daily basis, then apply for this position. If you see yourself as always being a friend that’s being asked about certain things or you like being asked for advice and you feel these things come naturally to you, I would definitely say this would be a good position. [As a peer health educator], you would be able to tell others about different resources they can use to help themselves and have an impact on a large amount of people.

Who did you get your flu shot for?

Who did you get your flu shot for?

Do you want to help your friends, family, roommates and co-workers stay healthy? A flu shot not only helps prevent you from getting the flu, it also protects everyone in the community.

When you get a flu shot, you protect those you live with. You also help protect:

  • People who live in close quarters such as residence halls
  • Those with chronic illnesses and pregnant women who are at high-risk for flu related complications
  • Individuals who have a weakened immune system
  • People who are unable to get a vaccine, for example, people with allergies to the vaccine or any ingredient in it
  • Babies younger than 6 months of age who are too young to get a flu vaccine
  • Elderly people who are at a greater risk for getting ill from the flu

Cougs help Cougs stay well — and that means getting a flu vaccine.

Health & Wellness Services is giving flu shots every Friday from September 29 – October 27 between 10 am – 3 pm, in the Washington Building, room G41. Bring your insurance card.

When to see your doctor

Even if you get your flu shot and practice good health habits, it’s still possible to get sick. If you happen to get the flu despite being vaccinated, a flu shot may help make symptoms milder.

When you’re sick with the flu, the best thing to do is stay home and avoid contact with other people. According to the university policy on absences, instructors cannot require written excuses from health care professionals. If your instructor asks for a note, you can provide our letter on excused student absences.

Make sure you seek medical care if:

  • Your temperature is greater than 101 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Your symptoms do not improve
  • Your breathing becomes difficult
  • You experience pain in your chest or stomach
  • You become dizzy or lightheaded
  • You are vomiting and can’t keep fluids down

Most healthy people don’t need antiviral medicines for treating influenza. They are different from antibiotics in that they kill viruses, not bacteria. When treatment starts within twp days of the beginning of your symptoms, antivirals can help make symptoms milder and shorten your illness. If your doctor prescribes antiviral medication, be sure to take them as directed.

Make sure you know the difference between cold and flu symptoms and how to manage symptoms at home!

If you are unsure about your symptoms, you can call our 24-hour nurse line at 509-335-3575.

The best way to lower your chances of contracting the flu is by getting a flu vaccine.

Welcome from Health & Wellness Services

Welcome from Health & Wellness Services

Welcome to all new and returning students from all of us at Health & Wellness Services! We’re here to support you in all aspects of health. We provide services and programs designed to help you thrive mentally, emotionally and physically.

Our medical clinic is one of the largest in the area, and works much like your family doctor’s office at home. We provide general medical care, plus a wide range of other services. Our full-service retail pharmacy is a great option if you’d like to transfer and fill your prescriptions without leaving campus. In the spring, we also opened a vision clinic where we provide eye care services and a retail store with a variety of eyewear and accessories.

Thinking about quitting tobacco? Now’s a great time to start! This fall, WSU Pullman will become a tobacco-free campus. Our tobacco cessation program can help you explore your options for quitting, improve your motivation and learn new ways to manage stress and cravings.

In addition to clinical medical services, we provide free programs and workshops on a variety of health topics to the entire WSU community. Workshops cover topics like healthy relationships, stress management, alcohol education, time management and more.

Our providers work closely with Counseling and Psychological Services to provide comprehensive mental health treatment for students. Our health promotion team is also working to support students’ mental and emotional health through a variety of efforts including trainings like Mental Health First Aid and our new suicide prevention program, Campus Connect.

Our violence prevention programs are another great opportunity for students. Bystander training workshops focus on making our campus safer by empowering Cougs to become active participants in preventing violence.

Got questions? We’re here to help in any way we can. Come visit us in the Washington building, call 509-335-3575 or schedule an appointment online.